(noun) nonchalant absurdity with a dash of embarrassment.

(verb) to be shark bitten.

(adverb) in a manner that is nonchalantly absurd and embarrassing.


09 March 2012

Moving Image Art Fair @ The Tunnel Space

The Moving Image Art Fair at the Tunnel Space in Chelsea is a well curated fair, both aesthetically and the selection of video content, which ranges from works produced this year to more archival video such as Martha Wilson's I have become my own worst fear/Deformation (1974) and Valie Export's Indecency Sheds Its Skin (1986). Jesse Fleming's The Snail and the Razor is a slow moving short that makes one clench their teeth;in the film the artist trained a garden snail to crawl up and over the razor, and it is able to do so flawlessly. Daniel Phillips' River Street series includes an installation where the artist projects his video on concrete slabs with debris, creating a dynamic environment of video and sculpture; the way he chooses to project his work, personally, I have not seen this done before. Alex Prager's Despair has a clean, Hollywood cinematic quality to it, and the long list of the production team makes it obvious why the artist is able to make suicide look more than beautiful. The subject matter is dark, but the costume, the actress Bryce Dallas Howard and set design are gorgeous, and the editing, well executed--this film was one of my favorites. The fair is free, and the films, for the most part, are accessible to a broad audience. The Moving Image Art Fair runs until Sunday, March 11. For more information visit the Moving Image website.


Alex Prager

Daniel Phillips

Martha Wilson

Valie Export

Hunter Reynolds

Kate Gilmore 

08 March 2012

Cindy Sherman @ The MoMA

[PRESS RELEASE]Cindy Sherman (American, b. 1954) is widely recognized as one of the most important and influential artists in contemporary art. Throughout her career, she has presented a sustained, eloquent, and provocative exploration of the construction of contemporary identity and the nature of representation, drawn from the unlimited supply of images from movies, TV, magazines, the Internet, and art history. Working as her own model for more than 30 years, Sherman has captured herself in a range of guises and personas which are at turns amusing and disturbing, distasteful and affecting. To create her photographs, she assumes multiple roles of photographer, model, makeup artist, hairdresser, stylist, and wardrobe mistress. With an arsenal of wigs, costumes, makeup, prosthetics, and props, Sherman has deftly altered her physique and surroundings to create a myriad of intriguing tableaus and characters, from screen siren to clown to aging socialite.
Bringing together more than 170 photographs, this retrospective survey traces the artist’s career from the mid 1970s to the present. Highlighted in the exhibition are in-depth presentations of her key series, including the groundbreaking series "Untitled Film Stills" (1977–80), the black-and-white pictures that feature the artist in stereotypical female roles inspired by 1950s and 1960s Hollywood, film noir, and European art-house films; her ornate history portraits (1989–90), in which the artist poses as aristocrats, clergymen, and milkmaids in the manner of old master paintings; and her larger-than-life society portraits (2008) that address the experience and representation of aging in the context of contemporary obsessions with youth and status. The exhibition will explore dominant themes throughout Sherman’s career, including artifice and fiction; cinema and performance; horror and the grotesque; myth, carnival, and fairy tale; and gender and class identity. Also included are Sherman’s recent photographic murals (2010), which will have their American premiere at MoMA.
In conjunction with the exhibition, Sherman has selected films from MoMA’s collection, which will be screened in MoMA’s theaters during the course of the exhibition. A major publication will accompany the exhibition.











BRUCENNIAL 2012: CLUSTERFUCKERY

I wasn't sure what to expect when I went to the Brucennial, I only knew there would be a lot of work. You walk into this amazing real estate find for a pop-up show, and, just like that, you're hit right in the face with art, lots of it, because you can't look anywhere and not see a painting, sculpture, photograph, installation, whatever in the salon style, floor to ceiling installation. That's what so great about the show--how it is hung. It is as if the installation is the art itself, because when you look at the work individually, there are only a few pieces that stand out. However, the bad outweighs the good. Quirky, yes, or, in other words, organized chaos.











SCOPE NYC: ARMORY WEEK II

QUENTIN SHIH

QUENTIN SHIH

SAIR GARCIA 

DETAIL

DETAIL

DETAIL

GERARD ELLIS

GERARD ELLIS

JONG SEOK YOON

DETAIL

ANDREAS von GEHR

SCOPE NYC: ARMORY WEEK I

RUBY ANEMIC

JOANIE LEMERCIER

CHUL HYUN AHN


MICHAEL MURPHY